Living Single

Living Single alone reading on bench

Living single has its advantages and has its disadvantages as everything else in life does.

It has been noted several times over the years that married individuals and partners tend to live longer and less stressful lives than those of single individuals.

This is due largely to the fact that your significant other permits you to release stress by being your sounding board, your mediator, and your support system.

If you are single you can take comfort by developing close friendships. Religious sects offer relief, as well as other groups that share similar interests as you.

Get involved with people through hobbies that you enjoy partaking in. Join a bowling league or maybe do volunteer work.

Living single man alone



You are never truly alone; many other individuals are in search of new acquaintances.



Every warm-blooded being needs companionship, even animals. Living single doesn’t have to mean living alone. If you don’t mind a little bit of work in exchange for a lot of companionship a cat that you can confide in is a wonderful outlet.

A dog that you can walk will lead to meeting neighbors that you may have lived next to for years without actually getting acquainted with them. There is no reason that a single person should let social support elude them.

Support groups are an excellent option for individuals to use to expand their interaction in the social arena. When you are single you value the reassurance and security that these groups can offer.

Support groups have been established worldwide for many different reasons so that people can share their experiences, both the ups and downs. Besides being an outstanding resource of knowledge, they are a strong means of emotional support.

By reaching out to help another we inevitably help ourselves.

When first visiting a support group, as with every other initial social interaction, you may feel nervous and awkward.

Be sure to take into account that every person there most likely felt nervous and awkward as they made their first approach.

On your first visit, other individuals are going to be excited to have a new face in the group. They’ll want to know your name and what lead you to them. After the first two or three visits you will feel more comfortable.

The group itself can become an extended family as you make friends that understand, share, and offer their encouragement.

______________________________________________________________

other Related Links

If you are living single focus on a hobby to stay busy until someone new enters your life _______________________________________________________________


Homepage/Search box l Gift Collections l site map l contact us

Subscribe to Our Monthly Newsletter l Build Your Website







mastering emotional control



Mastering Emotional Controls





Emotions

The stress that anger will cause you

Do you use passive anger to sabotage yourself?

Aggressive anger and negativity
Anger management

Gain control over your anger

Accepting change and reducing your stress

The human factor - Attribution theory

A crisis that can escalate high levels of stress

Dealing with death

Do you still have enthusiasm for life?

How do you find happiness

Is there life after death?

Altering your perception changes your life

Have you been a victim of road rage

Suffering from social anxiety disorders

How stress effects emotions

when crisis hits


Mental Stress


Letting go of a Relationship

Building your self esteem

How your beliefs make your world

Overcome emotional scars

Disconnect from past false impressions

Healing from mental abuse

Eliminate mental stress


Dr. Articles

Advice from the experts

Using Self Talk to change your reactions

Compliment Sandwich

Benefits of Anger

Anger Management

Anger Management Tips

Acupuncture relieves pain

Effects of acupuncture

Freeze frame technique

Health based solutions

Migraine relief

The anger iceberg
Tough economic times

8 Tools of anger control summary

Feng Shui Journey

Free Hypnosis Course

What is a Panick Attack?

Anxiety and Your Day to Day

INSOMNIA: Tricks to Go to Sleep, and Stay Asleep